Political Rants

Imagine all the families…

illustration of gray wire
Photo by izhar khan on Pexels.com

Imagine this:

You live in a country with a sub-standard level of medical care, police, and education.

You are constantly threatened by drug runners and/or their gangs.

You have a four year old child who clearly has a disability, and so the gangs exploit it, knowing that your child wouldn’t understand not to go with them. Your child has no sense of danger.

You cannot get help from the police, or the police may be working with the gangs.

You are in fear for your child’s life.

You are in fear for your own life.

You have heard you can go to America to apply for asylum.

You pack up a few belongings, leaving behind family mementos and other important parts of your history because there are only two of you and you will need to take turns carrying your child.

You undertake the journey.

You make it to the border filled with hope. Your family will finally be safe. You can work towards citizenship. You can get jobs.

Instead, you are immediately stopped, ignored when you ask from asylum, separated from you child, put into prison, and hear that your child will be moved to a “camp.” You have no idea what this camp will be like, and you fear that, because of your child’s disability, they will be ignored and in great danger.

You child has no coping skills. Your child cannot do many things that their peers cannot do: they cannot feed themselves, they cannot speak, they cannot use the toilet or wash themselves.

Now.

Imagine that you’re that child.

Now.

Go back to being yourself. And explain to me why this concept of separating and caging families is acceptable in any way?

[I do want to note that right now, families are not being separated at the border. However, the changes are not true protections in any way – it merely says that families be housed together “where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources.” As per CCN, “It was not immediately clear whether the caveats would still result in a substantial number of separations.”Separations has already become commonplace and acceptable to many Trump supporters, and I am afraid it will happen again.]

 

family

I should know better by now

Sometimes we expect more from others because we would be willing to do that much for themAs the awesome singer/songwriter Emma Wallace once said, “Pumpkins don’t turn into a coach anyhow. But I still grow ‘em in my garden patch, though I should know better by now.”

The same thing can be true of family. I should stop expecting anything, but sometimes, it’s hard to realize that people that are supposed to care just don’t.

My son just turned 16 this past Sunday. He had a birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese because he loves it. Pictures of the events, showing him enjoying himself, went live on FB.

My sister saw the images. She even commented on one, noting how much fun he looked to be having. But she didn’t say happy birthday. 

No one in my family did.

I admit, my family is pretty small: I only have a sister and a father, and I’m not exactly close with my father for various reasons, but just because I’m not close to him doesn’t mean that he can’t at least try to reach out to his grandson. His first grandson. His older grandson. He didn’t. My sister didn’t.

I don’t even ask for presents for him, although that would certainly be nice. But a simple “happy birthday” on FB, in a text message, or even during a phone call would make a difference.

Sending a card, I think, isn’t too big a deal either – a stamp costs less than $.50, and if you go to the Dollar Tree, you can buy a cute birthday card for $.50, too. A dollar. Spend a dollar. I don’t think that’s asking for a lot, really I don’t.

The problem with all these things, though, is that they all expect the person on the other end of the situation to set a date in their phone or write a date on a paper calendar. That’s the effort I think is lacking. The simple act of remembering.

So, it’s another year of nothing.

Nothing.

I should know better by now.